Liquid Suspension:

Maalox Plus Liquid Suspension is suitable for children above 2 years, as follows:

2 – 5 years: No more than one 5ml spoonful three times a day. This medication should be given 20 minutes to 1 hour after meals or at bedtime. Alternatively, use as directed by your doctor. (Remember: always shake the bottle before use)

5 – 12 years: A maximum of one 5 ml spoonful three to four times a day. This medication should be given 20 minutes to 1 hour after meals and at bedtime. Alternatively, use as directed by your doctor. (Remember: always shake the bottle before use)

12 – 18 years: A maximum of one to two 5 ml spoonful four times a day. This medication should be given 20 minutes to 1 hour after meals and at bedtime. Alternatively, use as directed by your doctor. (Remember: always shake the bottle before use)

Tablets:

Maalox Plus Tablets are not recommended for children.

A. Please tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking or have recently taken any other medicines.

This includes medicines you buy without a prescription, including herbal medicines.

Maalox Plus should not be taken simultaneously with other medicines. This is because if Maalox Plus is taken within one hour of another medicine it can affect the uptake of that medicine into the blood.

A. No, Maalox Plus is an over the counter medicine so you don’t need a prescription to buy it.

A. Maalox Plus contains three active ingredients which work together to help relieve the discomfort of trapped wind and bloating:

  • Simeticone (an anti-foaming agent)
  • Dried aluminium hydroxide gel (antacid)
  • Magnesium hydroxide (antacid)

Simeticone relieves bloating by ‘joining-up’ small gas bubbles to create one larger gas bubble which can then be passed more easily. The antacids work together to neutralise the acid within the stomach which helps to combat the symptoms of indigestion and heartburn. To see a video explain how Maalox Plus works go here.

A. You should wait twenty minutes to one hour after eating before taking Maalox Plus. For further information please see the following patient information leaflets:

Maalox Plus Suspension patient information
Maalox Plus Tablets patient information

A. Do not use Maalox Plus after the expiry date has passed. The expiry date refers to the last day of the month shown and can be found after the letters ‘EXP’ on: the Patient Information leaflet for Maalox Plus suspension and the carton and foil for Maalox Plus tablets.

A. Maalox Plus should begin to ease symptoms in under 30 minutes.

A. Maalox Plus should be stored in a safe place where children cannot see or reach it. Maalox Plus Suspension should not be allowed to freeze and Maalox Plus Tablets should be stored below 25°C.

A. You should talk to your doctor or pharmacist before taking Maalox Plus if you are pregnant or breast feeding.

A. Maalox Plus tablets should be well-chewed.

A. Maalox Plus contains three active ingredients which work together to relieve bloating, trapped wind, indigestion and heartburn:

  • simeticone (an anti-foaming agent that treats trapped wind)
  • dried aluminium hydroxide gel (antacid), and
  • magnesium hydroxide (antacid).

A. Although uncommon, Maalox Plus can cause constipation and diarrhoea. You should tell your doctor if either of these side effects gets serious or lasts longer than a few days.

A. If you have further questions about Maalox Plus or other Maalox products you should speak to your pharmacist or GP.

A. Heartburn is a symptom, not a condition or a disease. Signs of heartburn include: burning chest pain, discomfort after eating and a sour taste in the mouth that creeps up the throat.

Whereas indigestion is a condition - the medical term for which dyspepsia - which includes a number of symptoms including: heartburn, stomach pain, feeling nauseated and feeling bloated.

A. Maalox Plus is part of the Maalox range of products. Maalox treats heartburn and indigestion whereas Maalox Plus treats trapped wind as well as heartburn and indigestion. This is because the active ingredient simeticone is not present in Maalox.

Maalox is not recommended for children under 14 years.

the part of the body containing the stomach and intestines, sometimes referred to as the belly

of or in the abdomen (see Abdomen)

another name for heartburn

the opening at the end of the digestive tract through which stools leave the body

the rectum (see Rectum)

natural, tiny organisms which are sometimes found in the large intestine (colon) that helps with digestion

to eject gas (or wind) noisily from the stomach through the mouth

when your tummy is stretched, puffy and uncomfortable

see Intestines

see Belching

a colourless, odourless gas found in fizzy (carbonated) drinks

the final section of the large intestine ending in the rectum

a common condition that can mean that stools (poo) are not being passed regularly, or that the bowels are not completely emptying

Diarrhoea is passing looser or more frequent stools than is normal

The collective name for the oesophagus, stomach and intestines that deal with the ingestion, digestion and absorption of foodstuffs and the elimination of associated wastes

The series of organs in the digestive system through which food passes, nutrients are absorbed, and waste is eliminated

another word for Indigestion

Dysphagia is the medical term for swallowing difficulties

see Flatulence

Flatulence is passing gas from the digestive system out of the back passage. It is more commonly known as ‘passing wind’ or ‘farting’

When a foodstuff causes an unpleasant reaction (such as bloating or diarrhoea)

Gas

see Flatulence

Heartburn can be a symptom or GORD - a common condition where stomach acid leaks out of the stomach and into the throat area

Gastroenteritis is an infection of the stomach and bowel (large intestine). The most common symptoms are vomiting and repeated episodes of diarrhoea (three or more episodes within 24 hours)

of or in the intestines (see Intestines)

the part of the digestive system that digests and absorbs nutrients (small intestine) and absorbs water from and eliminates waste (large intestine)

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common condition of the digestive system. Symptoms include stomach cramps, bloating, diarrhoea and constipation

sickness, especially when accompanied by an involuntary impulse to vomit

a muscular tube connecting the mouth with the stomach

see Flatulence

the end section of the intestine ending in the anus

Commonly refers to the organ for storing, diluting, and digesting food; or the part of the body containing the stomach, belly or abdomen

also known as gastric acid, stomach acid is a digestive fluid formed in the stomach

waste matter evacuated from the bowels (poo)

a build-up of wind, or gas, in the digestive system (oesophagus, stomach and intestines), either caused by swallowing air (particularly while eating) or through eating food that is difficult to digest